Small-Animal Emergency

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Expert Care, Trusted Service at Pilchuck

360.568.9111
11308 92nd Street SE, Snohomish

Small Animal Emergency

If your dog or cat is experiencing an emergency, immediately call Pilchuck Veterinary Hospital at 360.568.9111. Someone is available to answer your call 24 hours a day.

When the unexpected occurs and you need immediate veterinary advice, we’re only a phone call away. Members of our experienced team are available around the clock to help you decide if your pet is in need of emergency care.

Most of us would prefer not to think about emergencies. When a family pet becomes ill, is injured or needs nursing care, we’re always here to listen and respond to your concerns.

At Pilchuck, our experienced, caring doctors and support staff are animal lovers – just like you! You can trust us with your pet’s care, and be confident your dog or cat is in kind, competent hands. We appreciate the opportunity to be a part of your pet’s health care team.

  • Emergency veterinarian on-site, around-the-clock
  • Triage to ensure prompt care for critical cases
  • Emergency diagnostic and treatment services
  • Fully equipped surgical suite
  • Post-operative care and 24-hour ICU
  • Inpatient care and transfusion medicine
  • Skilled, caring medical team

In an emergency, call Pilchuck at 360.568.9111 and be prepared to provide your name and your pet’s name, your location and ETA, and your pet’s emergency. Safely transport your pet to Pilchuck and bring your pet’s medical records if at all possible, if you are not a regular client.

Emergency care is all about identifying life-threatening problems and stabilizing the patient. When you arrive at Pilchuck, your pet’s condition will be assessed by our skilled emergency team. Our attending veterinarian will talk with you as soon as possible about your pet’s condition so you can make informed decisions about your pet’s care. If Pilchuck is not your pet’s primary care veterinarian, we work closely with him or her to provide the best-possible outcome and recovery.

 

Page updated April 29, 2013