Spring Ahead With These Seasonal Safety Tips for Your Pet

By Joe Musielak, DVM, PVH Small-Animal Emergency Department

Spring is on the way! While almost everyone loves the onset of springtime, the season arrives with its own hazards for pets.

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  • Gardening poisons: In our part of the country, we emergency veterinarians see many pets hospitalized for ingesting slug and snail baits that contain metaldehyde. This particular substance causes seizures if ingested. Prompt treatment is needed to save your pet’s life. Compost also contains mold compounds that lead to seizures. If you do compost, keep the pets away!
  • Easter lilies: Those beautiful white trumpets that many people buy this time of year – along with some of their cousins that aren’t necessarily white – can lead to severe kidney failure and death in cats. This is one of those poisons where you don’t want to wait to see how your cat does. Prompt and aggressive treatment is necessary. If you live with cats, keep lilies out of your home!
  • Chocolates: Not all those chocolate Easter eggs and chocolate bunnies will be found by the children! Some will be found by your dog, either in the yard, in the house, and, in some instances, in your car on the way home from the grocery store! Chocolate – especially baker’s chocolate and dark chocolate – is toxic to pets no matter what the season.
  • Daffodils, jonquils, narcissus: Most of us are excited to see these bloom this time of the year. Most animals will not readily eat these leaves, which can look like thick blades of grass. However, some dogs and cats will attempt to play with them, and we know that cats and dogs sometimes chew on things they play with. These plants contain calcium oxalate crystals, which can cause severe internal swelling of the throat and, if severe enough, will stop your pet from breathing if the throat swells shut.
  • The Easter Ham, Turkey, Roast: No matter what you are feasting on, keep it out of reach of your pet! Things can sometimes get a little hectic with family and friends over. If you leave a tempting dish unattended on the counter or table ... or even in an easily accessed garbage can, chances are it will be devoured by your furry friend. Dramatic changes in diet such as gorging on the Easter ham can cause gastrointestinal upset and pancreatitis. Also: Watch out for any bones!

PVH offers comprehensive and 24/7 emergency care. Call 360.568.3113 for appointments (available seven days a week). Now offering house calls for dogs and cats! Located in Snohomish.

Article added 3.2.15